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June 22, 2008

Soldiers deliver toys to Iraqi girls’ school

Filed under: CentCom, children, good works, ME, MNF-I — Rosemary Welch @ 2:51 pm

by U.S. ARMY SGT Daniel Blottenberger
18th Military Police Brigade

CAMP VICTORY — When Iraqi Police and Coalition troops arrived at the Zainab Girls School in Hurriyah June 12, they were met by the smiling faces of more than 50 children and their caretakers in the Baghdad community. “This makes it all worth while,” said 1st Sgt. Thomas Gray, 64th MP Co., 18th Military Police Brigade, Multi-National Division – Baghdad, who is a native of Oxford, Conn., after boxes full of school supplies and toys were handed out to the grateful Iraqi children.

The Hurriyah IP brought toys and supplies to hand out to the children to help show the families of the area that IP were here to help protect and serve the community. “This event gives the IP an opportunity to interact with the people other than neighborhood patrols and checkpoint operations,” said Staff Sgt. Joseph Reinsburrow, squad leader, 64th Military Police Company, who is a native of Towanda, Pa.

Reinsburrow and his squad of military police Soldiers have been conducting police transition team (PTT) operations with the Hurriyah IP for eleven months now. The PTT Soldiers are military police who interact, train and advise IP personnel from the local police officer, or “shurta,” to the most senior leaders as they conduct their day-to-day missions.

The mission for the IP on this day was to hand out school supplies and toys to the local children, many of whom are orphans.“It is always a good feeling when you can make an Iraqi kid smile,” said 1st Lt. Geneva Arnold, platoon leader, 64th MP Co., who is a native of Tucson, Ariz. The IP handed out backpacks, school supplies and soccer balls to the children, who were ecstatic upon receiving the items from the policemen and MND-B Soldiers. The operation helped further the relationship between the locals and the IP.

“The citizens of Hurriyah are not afraid to come and talk to the IP,” said Sgt. Angel Villegas, 64th MP Co., who is a native of El Paso, Texas. “On normal operation days at the station, there are lines out the door of people coming to get assistance from the IP.” The PTT Soldiers said they felt the Hurriyah citizens recognize the Hurriyah IP as a force dedicated to bringing the rule of law to the community. “The citizens see the IP are just out there doing their job as IP,” said Reinsburrow.

In the past year of working with the IP, the PTT has seen them become a well-recognized force that brings law and order to their local community. “When we got here, the IP were just getting a foothold in the area,” said Villegas. “Now, they are a force capable of operating on their own.”

The Hurriyah IP showed their ability to protect their community during an uprising by criminal groups in Baghdad.“The IP stayed at their posts and manned the checkpoints during the uprising,” said Reinsburrow. Now that violence has decreased in the area, IP can focus on building better relationships within their local communities.“The IP are making a positive impact on their citizens’ lives,” said Arnold.

After all the school supplies and toys were handed out, the IP and MND-B Soldiers mounted back up in their vehicles to return to their daily mission of keeping the citizens of Hurriyah safe. The 64th MP Co. is deployed from Fort Hood, Texas, and is currently assigned to the 716th Military Police Battalion, 18th MP Bde., MND-B.

Staff Sgt. Joseph Reinsburrow holds an Iraqi child June 12 in Hurriyah, while Iraqi Police and Coalition forces hand out toys and school supplies to the local children. (Army photo by Sgt. Daniel Blottenberger).

Source: CENTCOM.

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June 15, 2008

Sailors, Soldiers repair school

Filed under: CentCom, children, HOA, recon, school — Rosemary Welch @ 11:12 pm

by Petty Officer 3rd Class John Hulle
CJTF-HOA

DJIBOUTI (June 12, 2008) — U.S. Servicemembers here gathered an assortment of materials and construction skills to make repairs to the Balbalas primary school. Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 74, based out of Gulfport, Miss., and Soldiers from the 412th Civil Affairs Battalion, based out of Columbus, Ohio, replaced light fixtures, hinges and hasps on shutters, fixed doorframes and repaired a water pump and cistern during an ongoing project at the school that is expected to be completed in June. The soldiers and sailors are deployed to Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa. “I enjoy coming out and working on projects like this. I like to get out and help the community,” said Builder 2nd Class Kevin Bragwell, NMCB 74 crewmember. “Plus, every time we come out here, there’s something different to do.”

This was the first time Army Capt. Sikiru Kafaru, 412th CA BN team leader, worked side by side with Seabees. Kafaru said this was an “outstanding” experience. “For us it’s an exciting thing,” he said. “We appreciate the Seabees getting involved.” Without NMCB 74’s involvement, the 412th CA BN would have just donated the materials. Instead, by using the construction force’s building expertise, the crew is able to complete the many small projects and spend more time interacting with the community. “It’s a good thing,” said Bragwell. “We get good reactions, especially from the children. They are excited to see us.”

Housssin Abdi Ali, a fourth grade teacher at Balbalas, agrees. He said the Soldiers and Seabees having a presence at the school helps build the relationship between Djibouti and the U.S. Ali also said he hopes the improvements can help the school accommodate more than 2,000 students it already teaches. “If you are not educated, you are blind. That’s why this is so important,” he said.

Construction Electrician 2nd Class Justin Johnson repairs a light fixture at the Balbala primary school in Djibouti on May 31.

Source: CENTCOM.

May 2, 2008

Cuscatlan Battalion delivers wheelchairs, gives hope

Filed under: CentCom, children, ME, medics, people, supplies — Rosemary Welch @ 2:52 pm

by SFC Stacy Niles
214th Fire Brigade PAO

FOB DELTA, Iraq (April 24, 2008) – The El Salvador Cuscatlán Battalion X rotation distributed 125 wheelchairs to disabled children and adults at the al-Rhama Disabled Association in al-Kut, Iraq, April 18. “I was shocked by the large number of children,” said Col. Walter Arévalo, commander of the Cuscatlán Battalion. Many of the wheelchair recipients suffer from conditions such as epilepsy, heart disease, migraines and eye and skin disorders, said Arévalo.

Hussein Kase, a 12-year-old who received a wheelchair, is mute and suffers from a skin condition in addition to being paralyzed. The chair will give him mobility, said his father Kas Salaman. “I’m very happy about this gift,” Salaman said. “It will help him move and be able to play with the other children.”

More resources are needed to increase the quality of life for these individuals, said Arévalo. People had traveled from as far away as Basra, he said, to receive assistance. “It is important for us to run this type of activity,” Arévalo said. “We like to be able to give hope to the people.”

In addition to the wheelchairs, the Salvadoran soldiers distributed 125 packets of food and school supply kits.

Salvadoran Soldiers from the Cuscatlán Battalion X rotation distributed 125 wheelchairs, food packets and school supply kits at the al-Rhama Disabled Association in al-Kut, April 18.

Source: CENTCOM.

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April 20, 2008

Colonel: Coalition, Iraqi forces winning in Anbar

Filed under: CentCom, children, home, ME, recon, successes — Rosemary Welch @ 12:32 pm

Department of Defense

WASHINGTON (April 14, 2008) – Increased security brought about by military success against insurgents in the western portion of Iraq’s Anbar province is enabling a drawdown of U.S. forces there as well as enhanced regional reconstruction efforts, a senior Marine commander told Pentagon reporters. “The insurgents, by and large, have been marginalized in western Anbar,” Marine Corps Col. Pat Malay, commander of Regimental Combat Team 5, told Pentagon reporters during a satellite-carried news conference from Camp Ripper, Iraq.

Malay’s area of operations comprises about 30,000 square miles, an area about the size of South Carolina. During a previous Iraq tour in Fallujah two years ago, Malay recalled, multitudes of foreign fighters were entering western Iraq from Syria. Today, there are very few foreign fighters in his area of operations, he observed. “Quite frankly, I think we’ve killed a lot of them, and I think that the enemy is having a more difficult time recruiting to the numbers that they have in the past,” Malay said. In addition, foreign fighters no longer are transiting across the Syrian border into Anbar province, the colonel said.

With insurgents “on the run” in western Anbar province, the resultant reduced violence has enabled a drawdown of U.S. forces in his sector, Malay said. Three of his command’s five battalions have rotated home over the past three months, he noted. Meanwhile, the numbers of Iraqi security forces in western Anbar continue to grow, Malay said, noting his area of operations now has 5,000 police, 1,000 highway patrolmen and 7,000 Iraqi soldiers.

Iraqi soldiers and police are increasingly taking the lead in security operations, Malay said. Recent Iraqi-led operations have achieved successes against insurgents in Hit, Haditha and Qaim, he pointed out. The drop in violence also has enabled a larger focus on reconstruction programs such as building needed schools and providing water and electricity needs for the local populace, the colonel added.

Citing recent humanitarian assistance efforts in Anbar province, Malay pointed to the story of Amenah, a 2-year-old Iraqi girl from Haditha who was flown to the United States in February for surgery on her ailing heart. Surgeons at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., were able to correct Amenah’s congenital heart defect, Malay said. Today, Amenah is a healthy little girl, he noted, while the Haditha hospital is now receiving much-needed upgrades so it can attend to other sick children.

The American public should be very proud of U.S. servicemembers’ efforts in Anbar province, Malay said. “They’re the next great generation, and they are winning here,” Malay said of the Marines, sailors, airmen and soldiers serving in Anbar. “It’s mind-boggling; the changes that have taken place here.”

Amenah, a 2-year-old Iraqi girl from Haditha, was flown to the United States in February for successful surgery on her ailing heart. Haditha, located in formerly restive western Anbar province, today is experiencing reduced violence and widespread reconstruction. Photo by Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Shawn Coolman.

Source: CentCom.

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April 13, 2008

Baby left at doorstep finds new home

Filed under: adoption, CentCom, children, ME, medics — Rosemary Welch @ 2:07 pm

by Zach Mott
3rd BCT, 4th ID

BAGHDAD, Iraq (April 9, 2008) — Spotting irregularities is a tactic that is drilled into the minds of Multi-National Division – Baghdad Soldiers throughout training and in practice while in Iraq. Soldiers recently watched as a car pulled up to an entry control point at Forward Operating Base Callahan in northern Baghdad. They continued to watch as a woman stepped out of the car holding a bag. Once the woman dropped the bag near the gate, internal alarms were ringing and a careful search was called for and conducted.

That search yielded a newborn baby wrapped tightly in cloth. Soldiers raced to the bag, retrieved the child and brought him to the aid station to be examined. “We unwrapped it to make sure he was alive – and he wasn’t sick, he wasn’t dead, he wasn’t injured,” said Staff Sgt. Paul Briscoe, the aid station non-commissioned officer in charge at FOB Callahan. “He was a perfectly healthy baby. I’m guessing three to seven days old. He was in perfect health. There wasn’t a scratch on him.”

This unlikely sight brought images of the Las Vegas native’s two children to mind. “It was like my kids were newborns again,” said Briscoe, who serves with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Combined Arms Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Multi-National Division – Baghdad. After the medics were satisfied the baby, who by this time had drawn the nickname “Alex Callahan” after the Soldier who found him and the name of the base, was in no need of immediate medical attention, the focus shifted to what they would do with the child.

An interpreter working at the base volunteered to go to a nearby store to buy diapers and formula while another interpreter took care of Alex. Briscoe said the aid station became a hub of activity as word spread throughout the small base of the new arrival. “I’ve fed him twice, just holding him, watching him, making sure that he’s alright,” said Doreen Haddad, an interpreter with 1-68 AR, who helped care for Alex. “I’ve changed his diapers twice. I wanted to give him a bath, but I wasn’t able to.”

While a forward operating base isn’t the ideal location for a baby, Soldiers and those working at FOB Callahan ensured that Alex’s stay there was as comfortable as possible. The baby is to be adopted by the brother of a local national, who works at the base. The brother, and his wife, have been married five years and have been unable to have a baby of their own. The interpreters at FOB Callahan have taken a collection to donate to the family to help care for the baby.

Despite the thousands of miles that separates the Soldiers from their families in Colorado, one constant remains with this baby and those they left behind. “He’s sleeping and pooping, just like a regular baby,” Briscoe said.

“Alex Callahan,” the nickname for a baby boy left in a plastic bag near Forward Operating Base Callahan, sleeps soundly at the Coalition base in northern Baghdad. The baby was thoroughly checked out by medics and given a clean bill of health.(U.S. Army photo).

Source: CentCom.
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April 8, 2008

Soldiers help Iraqi girl see brighter future

Filed under: CentCom, children, good works, help, ME — Rosemary Welch @ 2:47 pm

by Kevin Stabinsky
2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division Public Affairs Office

FOB KALSU, Iraq (March 31, 2008) — Her hands run across his hand, her fingers explore his features. She asks her father: Is he fat or skinny? Tall or short? She is trying to learn about the man she cannot see, the one who strives to end the mystery surrounding him and the world around her.

First Lt. Michael Kendrick, platoon leader of 2nd Platoon, Company D, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, said it is his goal to replace the mental picture young Noor Taha Najee has of her father with the actual image.

Noor, a 5-year-old girl who lives in al Buaytha, has been blind since birth, a condition caused by poorly-developed corneas, said her father Taha. It is a problem that runs in the family. Taha’s brother, Mustafa, also suffers from the birth defect, one that prevents the eyes from registering anything other than light sensitivity. Although the condition is genetic, it is one that can be fixed through surgery. Kendrick, a native of Phoenix, Ariz., and his unit have been working closely with doctors to try to get something done for the family.

“To have her see her family, her brothers, to put a face to the voice, it would be a blessing,” Taha said of the opportunity to help give sight to his daughter and brother. The Eye Defects Research Foundation, a nongovernmental organization based in Los Angeles, is already trying to schedule a surgery for the girl. On March 14, the Soldiers took Noor and her uncle to the 86th Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad to get an evaluation done on the two, which showed a higher potential for success with Noor.

“We’re on standby now, waiting for a doctor in L.A.,” Kendrick said. He said they are now trying to find a local Iraqi doctor who would be willing to travel with Noor and her family to California. An Iraqi doctor is needed who could be shown the necessary follow-up care.

Such a gift would seem appropriate for a girl who is described as very generous and giving by her father. “She’s different from many other kids,” Taha said. “She’s always sharing. She’ll give you anything.”

It is a personality trait which has endeared her to the 2nd Platoon Soldiers. “We’ve taken a real vested interest in the people here,” Kendrick said, adding his Soldiers spend a lot of time on the ground, interacting with residents. “We empathize with the people. It pays dividends winning the hearts and minds. It keeps things quiet.”

Noor has developed quite an attachment to Kendrick, Taha said. “She likes to sit by him, and is always asking me about him and loves it when I tell her stories about him,” he said. “She’s only like that with Kendrick.”

As a father of two young girls himself – Presley, 3, and Parker, 1, – Kendrick said he knows the importance of family and providing for them. While she may not be able to see what the Soldiers are doing for her, Taha said Noor can definitely sense the goodwill of Kendrick’s platoon. “Love begins in the mind, not the eyes,” Taha said.

Noor Taha Najee gives 1st Lt. Michael Kendrick a goodbye kiss near the end of a March 26 visit to her house in al Buaytha, Iraq. Noor, whose corneas are underdeveloped, has been blind since birth. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Kevin Stabinsky).

Source: CentCom.
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April 3, 2008

Wednesday’s Hero: Captain Daniel J. Burkhart

Filed under: children, Heroes, Military Families, otb, SW Asia — Rosemary Welch @ 9:21 am

Captain Daniel J. Burkhart is this week’s Wednesday Hero. He is deployed to Afghanistan to train the Afghan Border Patrol. (Be nice if we could have some, but that’s a different article.) Here is a little about him.

He is a Captain in US Army, 2/358, who is from West Springfield. He has been awarded the Bronze Star for doing an excellent job while over in Afghanistan, and also for going above and beyond the call of duty.

He has been going to the refugees camps which are little more than mud huts that look as though they had been trampled on so he could help them in their needs, yet he feels as though he receives more from them in return. He brings them gifts from the people here at home send to him, including his Mom who is a big fan of his.

His hope is that when they grow up, they will remember the kindness of the US Military. In this hope, he is solemnly aware of the influence of the Taliban and their teachings. Maybe, just maybe, the hatred of the Taliban will be so at odds with what they know as a fact. If this happens, then the Taliban will be rejected.

He will, in the long run, be very grateful to return home to his new wife and child. They have only been together 27 out of the 40 months of their marriage. He was able to take leave when his daughter was born, but he had to leave six days after. This was one of the hardest things he has ever done. The children in Afghanistan, however, kept reminding of him of how much we in America are blessed. This is a good thing. I have a feeling he will miss these children, too, when he returns home. Read more about him here:

Hometown: West Springfield, MA.
Awarded: Bronze Star
Stories: West Springfield story.
Download this hero’s story: Right click and “Save Target As…” to download.

I realize today is Thursday, but I did not want to pass this Hero by. I was up late last night due to technical difficulties, but at least I took the opportunity to introduce to you this Hero. Have a wonderfully blessed day.

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Right Truth: Real Life Experience.
Conservative Cat.
The Yankee Sailor: Thursday Open Post.
D=S: WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOU COULD GO BACK IN TIME?
Leaning Straight Up: Checking Hell’s temperature, as the 9th Circuit Court Upholds Ten Commandments display.
Maggie’s Notebook: Haditha Marines – One Still Facing Trial.
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12. Leaning Straight Up: KVI today: Ken Schram thinks your kids are wimps.
13. Nuke Gingrich: Imagination and inspiration. What’s next.

March 28, 2008

Decision to Ban Homeschoolers is Vacated!

Filed under: children, court, Family, injustice, Justice, ota, Sovereignty — Rosemary Welch @ 10:57 am

I have just learned from the Family Research Center that the 2nd District Court of Appeals has vacated the decision by the California Supremes to ban anyone and everyone who does not a California quality teachers certificate and/or belongs to one of the many unions we have out here, then your career as a teacher to your children was over! Good for you, 2nd Court of Appeals. However the fight is not yet over.

I have to wait an hour to reach the office, but the link they’ve provided is incorrect. Hey, things happen. It’s just very good to know that the whole world hasn’t gone looney!

The Court is still going to have another hearing about this issue, so please put on your prayer slippers. AND USE THEM! 😉

We must fight back for the sake of our children, our families, our communities, our states, and our sovereignty! Since when does the government own our children??? THEY MOST CERTAINLY DO NOT. They want to claim nutrality when it comes to religion? Okay, then explain to me why it’s okay to have muslims praying in school, but Christian children are not even afforded the benefit of a moment of silence? Hmm?

Here is the link to the Family Research Center: FRC. Have a great day. I will try to get that link for us. 😉

Update: Here is the link to this news article.

Court of Appeal Grants Petition for Re-hearing

On March 25, the California Court of Appeal granted a motion for rehearing in the In re Rachel L. case—the controversial decision which purported to ban all homeschooling in that state unless the parents held a teaching license qualifying them to teach in public schools.

The automatic effect of granting this motion is that the prior opinion is vacated and is no longer binding on any one, including the parties in the case.

The Court of Appeal has solicited a number of public school establishment organizations to submit amicus briefs including the California Superintendent of Public Instruction, California Department of Education, the Los Angeles Unified School District, and three California teacher unions. The court also granted permission to Sunland Christian School to file an amicus brief. The order also indicates that it will consider amicus applications from other groups.

Home School Legal Defense Association will seek permission to file such an amicus brief and will coordinate efforts with a number of organizations interesting in filing briefs to support the right of parents to homeschool their children in California.
Court of Appeal Grants Petition for Re-hearing.

On March 25, the California Court of Appeal granted a motion for rehearing in the In re Rachel L. case—the controversial decision which purported to ban all homeschooling in that state unless the parents held a teaching license qualifying them to teach in public schools.

The automatic effect of granting this motion is that the prior opinion is vacated and is no longer binding on any one, including the parties in the case.

The Court of Appeal has solicited a number of public school establishment organizations to submit amicus briefs including the California Superintendent of Public Instruction, California Department of Education, the Los Angeles Unified School District, and three California teacher unions. The court also granted permission to Sunland Christian School to file an amicus brief. The order also indicates that it will consider amicus applications from other groups.

Home School Legal Defense Association will seek permission to file such an amicus brief and will coordinate efforts with a number of organizations interesting in filing briefs to support the right of parents to homeschool their children in California.

There is also a Hat Tip to Michelle Malkin: Court to reconsider California home school ruling. She is always right on the cutting edge. I’d watch out if I were you! This is very good news indeed. 😉

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March 27, 2008

Girl awaiting surgery may get wish

Filed under: CentCom, children, ME, medics, USA — Rosemary Welch @ 12:33 pm

3rd Infantry Division Public Affairs

FOB KALSU, Iraq (March 20, 2008) – A young girl and her family are anxiously awaiting a decision from an organization in Los Angeles to determine the fate of her eyesight.

Soldiers of Company D, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, escorted 5-year-old Noor to the 86th Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad, March 14, to have her eyes evaluated by an optometrist. The medical evaluation done in Iraq will give doctors almost 8,000 miles away the information they need to determine whether they’ll perform the surgery.

Initial diagnosis by Lt. Col. Hee-Choon Lee, battalion surgeon for the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, found that Noor was blind due to a birth defect which resulted in poorly-developed corneas in both her eyes. Her 32-year-old uncle Mustafa also suffers from the same defect. The information from Noor’s medical appointment will be evaluated by doctors from the Eye Defects Research Foundation, a non-governmental organization in Los Angeles. The foundation will make a decision on whether or not she is a viable candidate for surgery and where the surgery would take place.

Lee said if representatives from the foundation can find other patients to operate on in Iraq, then a trip could be organized. If not, then coalition forces would work to have the young child and her family taken to Los Angeles to have the surgery done.

While her uncle is also being evaluated as a candidate for surgery, his case requires more caution. Lee said because he is an adult, his eyes might not heal as easily as those of his young niece. “I think Noor’s left eye has a lot of hope. Her right eye may not be a good candidate because it is too small,” said Lee a native of Larton, Va., “All the (ultrasound) pictures were sent up and we’re waiting.”

In a study of corneal transplants success in pediatric patients done by Emory University, the success rate in the best of circumstances was only 50 percent. “We are all working towards getting this young girl the gift of sight,” Lee said.

Source: CentCom.

Medics nurse starving child back to health

Filed under: CentCom, CF, children, illness, SW Asia — Rosemary Welch @ 11:11 am

Bagram Media Center.

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan (March 18, 2008) — Too weak to move out of the fetal position or even utter a noise, a malnourished 2-year-old girl, weighing only seven pounds, was nursed back to health by Afghan National Security and Coalition forces medics in Arghandab District, Zabul Province, recently.

“When she arrived she weighed 7.8 pounds,” said a Coalition soldier, at the scene. “She was so weak she could not move out of the fetal position and did not respond when we gave her a bath. Apparently, the child has never even attempted to speak either.”

She was brought to the attention of the ANSF during a humanitarian aid mission in Zabul Province during Feb. 25 and Coalition forces knew she would need to receive immediate care at a nearby Coalition medical facility to survive. Her father objected because he feared insurgent reprisal for accepting help from the Coalition forces. The District Chief eased his fears by explaining the consequences of inaction.

After deliberation, the father went with his daughter to the clinic for treatment, said the soldier. “The first two weeks of intensive care started this child on the road to recovery,” said a Coalition soldier.

During the initial stages of treatment, the medical team cared for the girl around the clock. To prevent future problems, the father was instructed on the proper care and feeding for a child of her age. By his own admission, the father had raised the infant exclusively on a diet of tea and bread. “She devoured every ounce of food we put in front of her,” the soldier said. “Her cheeks and face really filled out in a short time, and she finally uncurled out of the fetal position enough to move on her own.”

The girl weighed 12.6 pounds when Coalition medics released her March 12. She had gained almost five pounds in 12 days. “She still has a lot of recovering to do, but she is heading in the right direction,” a soldier said.

Photo: Afghan National Security and Coalition medics nursed a malnourished 2-year-old girl, weighing only seven pounds, back to health over two weeks in Arghandab District, Zabul Province, Feb. 25 to March 12.

Source: CentCom.

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